Workbench Plans

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If you're planning on building a workbench, start the building process off right by exploring a few workbench plans. The plans listed below will guide you through every step in the process of building your very own workbench from scratch. These plans are suitable for even novice builders and require very few tools to complete.

Original LoveToKnow Workbench Plans

To make things easier, two original plans have been provided for this article. These plans are designed to be easy to build and install so that anyone can complete them. If you need help downloading the printable plans, check out these helpful tips.

Corner Wall Workbench

The corner wall workbench is one of the simplest designs imaginable. Most people simply pick out a corner in their garage or basement and install the workbench there, hence the name. The biggest thing to consider with this workbench is that you should optimally have something to anchor the bench to. The whole purpose of using this specific style is that it imparts a little more stability than a standalone bench, so it is built to be anchored to a wall to provide that stability.

The Collapsing Workbench

Not everyone has access to a very big garage or a large workspace of any kind. Many people have to work with cramped attics or basements when they work on projects and don't have a lot of space to devote to a dedicated workbench spot. This workbench is designed to easily be put against a wall when you're not using it. This can help you make better use of the little space you may have at your disposal. The simplicity and mobile nature of this workbench makes it less suited for huge projects and more appropriate as a craft table.

Free Workbench Plans

If the plans listed above weren't exactly what you're looking for, then there are a number of other resources out there that provide you with free workbench plans. There's no need to buy an expensive woodworking book to find a plan for a workbench when there are plenty of websites offering plans that you can print out for free.

  • Workbenchdesign.net: Choose from complex workbench plans that include vises or simple plans that provide a sturdy workplace for your next project.
  • Hammerzone.com: This site claims that you can build a strong and sturdy workbench for around $20. The plan they offer looks simple and easy to follow.
  • Woodworkingplanfinder.com: There are many choices for workbenches here, including workbenches for:
    • Children
    • Woodworkers
    • Utilitarian purposes
    • CAD drawing
  • Doityourself.com: This website has a simple workbench plan plus some workbench building tips.
  • Popularmechanics.com: This site offers a nice plan for a workbench.
  • Wayneofthewoods.com: A free workbench for your garage or workshop.
  • Free-workbenchplans.com: A simple workbench design with easy to follow instructions.

Purchasing Workbench Plans

If you've checked out all the free plans and find that none of them really suits your needs, you can purchase plans that are relatively inexpensive. Take a look at some of the following websites to help you find the perfect plan for you.

  • Plansnow.com: Offers a variety of different plans for around $6 that you can download onto your computer or have shipped.
  • Bobsplans.com: This site provides a very simple design that is also very sturdy. The plans can be purchased for $8 and come bundled with a set of plans for a saw bench.
  • Workbenchdesign.net: This site offers free plans, but the more intricate plans are going to cost between $6 and $10.
  • Stor-n-fold.com: Specializes in plans for folding workbenches.
  • Woodcraft.com: Offers a couple of different plans for workbenches for around $10.

Building your Workbench

Although the plans listed above are either free or relatively cheap, the tools you need to build them are not. Most plans require the following "big ticket" tools to complete your workbench:

  • Circular saw
  • Miter saw
  • Router

If you already have these tools, you are ready to begin building your workbench. If you don't have these tools, consider buying them. You could probably do without the router if you are building a simple workbench, but for more complex workbenches, you are going to need it for things like routing out slots.

Final Workbench Building Tips

The following are some final tips to keep in mind when you are building your workbench.

  • Make it the right height: This becomes difficult when you plan on sharing the workbench with someone who is significantly taller or shorter than you. You may want to consider two workbenches if that is the case. Having a workbench at a height that is comfortable for your back, neck and legs when you are working prevents muscle strain and injury.
  • Don't forget the Bench Dog holes: These hole will hold the Bench Dogs. Bench Dogs can be as simple as a wooden peg that you make to fit the hole or can be the store bought metal or wood variety. Bench Dogs hold items like wood in place when you are working vertically or for planing.
  • Reinforce your workbench: You want your workbench to be sturdy, so don't forget to reinforce it with brackets.
  • Pre-drill your holes: This will not only make it easier when it is time to insert screws and bolts, but it will prevent the screw head from stripping and the wood from splitting.

Enjoy Using Your Hands

There are few things that are as satisfying as building something with your own hands. When you build a workbench, you aren't simply gaining the basic satisfaction that comes with creating something yourself. You're also getting a versatile, useful, thoroughly practical tool as the result of your labors. It's hard to beat the satisfaction this provides.

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Workbench Plans